Top 10 Most Expensive Star Trek Original Series memorabilia

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2015-06-26 10:22:02

The ten most valuable props and costumes ever sold from the original Star Trek television show

10) Galileo Shuttlecraft prop

The largest prop ever built for the OS was the Galileo II shuttlecraft, otherwise known as ‘NCC-1701/7’. The shuttle appeared on screen numerous times, including the first season episode ‘The Galileo Seven’, as the crew visited the surface of alien planets. The badly-decomposed prop was bought in 2012 by Star Trek collector Adam Schneider, who paid $70,150 during a Kiko Auctioneers sale. Schneider reportedly plans to restore the shuttle in time for a tour celebrating ths how’s 50th anniversary in 2016.

9) Type 1 hand phaser

This Type-1 Hand phaser was used throughout the first and seconds seasons. Stunt shots and distance shots featured cheaper, vacuum-formed rubber props, but close-up shots required weapons with more detail such as this example. Made from fibreglass, wood, aluminium and acrylic, this phaser came from the personal collection of Star Trek Compendium author Allen Asher who obtained it from Gene Rodenberry himself. It sold for $79,950 at Profiles in History in December 2011.

8) Balok puppet head from ‘The Corbomite Maneuver’

This alien puppet head not only appeared in the first season episode ‘The Corbomite Maneuver’, but it was the stand-out image from the closing credits of almost every OS episode. Created by sculptor Wah Ming Chang, who was responsible for numerous classic creatures from the show, the foam head sold at Profiles in History in June 2012 for $82,600.

7) U.S.S Enterprise Command Module

This command module from the bridge of the Enterprise was built in 1964 for the scrapped original pilot ‘The Cage’. Unlike most of the cast, it survived the cut for the next pilot ‘Where No Man Has Gone Before’ and appeared on-screen for all three subsequent seasons as a focal point for the bridge. It sold at Profiles in History in April 2003 for $92,000.

6) Capt. Kirk season one tunic

This original season one tunic worn by William Shatner was gifted to a family touring the set in the late 1960s. It was stored in a dark closet for four decades before crossing the auction block in 2012. Described as “quite possibly the earliest Kirk tunic in existence”, it sold for $98,400 at Profiles in History in July 2012.

5) Mr. Spock season two tunic

This tunic, worn by Leonard Nemoy during the show’s second season, came with a remarkable provenance. It had spent more than 40 years hanging in a closet, having been won in the TV Star Parade Star Trek Design-A-Costume Competition. It was accompanied by a typed-signed letter from Nemoy, along with letters from the show’s costume designer Bill Theiss and TV Star Parade editor Ptricia Langdon each congratulating the winner. It sold in December 2012 at Profiles in History for $114,000.

4) Mr. Spock season three tunic

This complete blue tunic, bearing the Science Division insignia and the two First Officer gold braids, was worn by Leonard Nemoy during the show’s third and final season in 1968-69. It sold for $132,250 – a record price for an OS tunic – at Profiles in History in April 2003.

3) Dr. McCoy's Tholian Web Spacesuit

It might look like one of the least-practical space suits ever worn on screen, but it’s also one of the most expensive. This silver lame suit was worn by Dr. ‘Bones’ McCoy in the season three episode ‘The Tholian Web’, and sold for $144,000 at the Christie’s ‘40 Years of Star Trek’ sale in October 2006.

2) Capt. Kirk's Phaser Rifle

After the first pilot episode was scrapped in 1965, NBC demanded a second, more action-packed show. Creator Gene Rodenberry replaced Jeffrey Hunter with William Shatner and gave him “a really big gun”, made for the show by Toy designer Reuben Klamer. The original screen-used prop gun sold at Julien’s in April 2013 for $231,000.

1) Captain's Chair from U.S.S Enterprise Bridge

Perhaps the ultimate piece of memorabilia from the series – apart from the original Enterprise model which still resides at the Smithsonian - is the Kirk’s Captain’s chair. One of the most iconic props in television history, the original chair was rescued by a fan when the set was dismantled in 1969. It sold at Profiles in History as part of the Bob Justman collection in June 2002, for a record price of $304,750.

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