POW MAIL, TO LIEUT W.F. DAVIS (RNR). HONG KONG, 8th, May, 1944. CLEAR POSTMARKS & CHOPS.

ellington55

ellington55

2018-11-21 04:29:40

The first batch of incoming mail for prisoners of war interned in Hong Kong was delivered on Christmas Day, 1942, exactly one year after the surrender, and letters arrived infrequently thereafter.

During the last two years of the war, large quantities of mail reached Hong Kong more frequently. However, the Japanese censors were unable to cope and the mail accumulated until Colonel Tokunaga, the Japanese Commandant of all of the POW camps in Hong Kong, ordered that letters containing more than fifty words would be burnt. Six wooden trunks containing mail were also burnt two days before the Japanese Surrender.

This cover was sent to a British prisoner of war at Camp N, Argyle Street, Kowloon. This camp contained officers, along with 100 soldiers as batmen, moved from Shamshuipo camp in April 1942. It is unlikely that the letter was finally delivered to the addressee at Camp N since the occupants were moved from Argyle Street back to Shamshuipo in Ma, 1944.

The cover was sent from Bristol in May 1944 and from the manuscript marking was not received until over a year later. It has been examined by both British and Japanese censors.

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