John Lennon's Handwritten Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds Lyrics

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2015-06-26 11:06:49

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John Lennon's Handwritten Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds Lyrics

John Lennon’s handwritten Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds Lyrics is a handwritten lyric sheet used in the creation of the third song from The Beatles’ eighth studio album, 1967’s Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The song was credited to both John Lennon and Paul McCartney upon its release, but is understood to have been written predominantly by Lennon.

Song and controversy

Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds caused some controversy following its release in 1967, with many media commentators believing that the song’s title translates as an acronym for the drug LSD.

But Lennon himself dispute this. As he and others have maintained, the song was actually inspired by his son Julian Lennon, when the latter – still a child – drew a picture of his classmate Lucy Vodden.

Julian is said to have showed the painting to his father and told him, “That's Lucy in the sky with diamonds.”

Nevertheless, speculation that the song alludes to LSD – a drug which Lennon is known to have experimented with in the 1960s – continues, thanks to (in the words of UK newspaper the Daily Mail) “the song's swooning melody and strange lyrics.”

Handwritten lyric sheet

The sheet contains the song's third verse as well as the opening words to She's Leaving Home: "Wednesday morning at…"

There is also a small Lennon sketch of four people in a room with windows draped in curtains. It has been speculated that the four figures represent The Beatles.

Lyrics

The handwritten sheet includes the following lines:

Picture yourself on a train in a station
With plasticine porters with looking glass ties
Suddenly someone is there at the turnstile
The girl with kaleidoscope eyes

Notable sales

In April 2011, it was widely reported that John Lennon’s handwritten Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds Lyrics would be auctioned at Profiles in History’s sale at the Saban Theater in Beverly Hills on May 14th and 15th.

The lyrics sold for $230,000, following "frenzied bidding".

 

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