The Rolling Stones - a history through collectibles


2015-06-26 13:20:34


The Rolling Stones - a history through collectibles

We chart the trajectory of the Rolling Stones through their amazing collectibles

After headlining Glastonbury Festival 2013 this weekend, the Rolling Stones have truly cemented their reputation as the longest serving, hardest working and outright legendary rock band of all time.

Starting back in 1962, the band have rarely been out of the limelight since. In their wake lies a trail of fantastic collectibles that chart their remarkable journey to the top

1962 Marquee Club bill

Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones in support of Long John Baldry

On July 12, 1962 Mick Jagger, Keith Richard, Brian Jones, Ian Stewart and Dick Taylor took to the stage at London's Marquee Club for their very first live performance. Playing an electric set of Chicago blues, as well as hits from the likes of Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley, the band were an instant success.

This original bill from the Marquee Club shows the band as Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones, playing in support of the legendary blues singer Long John Baldry. A throw-away piece of paper, these are extremely hard to find, but would undoubtedly bring thousands at auction.

Rumour has it that Ian Stewart's original set list from the Marquee Club is still in existence, with collectors anticipating the day it appears at auction.

The original recording contract that the band signed with Decca Records in 1963 sold for $22,784 in 2005.

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction gold record

Rolling Stones I Cant Get No Satisfaction gold record(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction featured during the climactic encore of the Stones' Glastonbury performance

By 1965, the Rolling Stones had seen a meteoric rise tothe topand were at the zenith of their career, with their fans eagerly emulating the hysteria seen during the Beatles' "Beatlemania".

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction was released in May 1965, during the band's third North American tour. It became their first number one in America and is, of course, one of their most famous songs.

This gold record was presented to Mick Jagger to commemorate 1m sales of the single. It is currently on sale with Gotta Have It for $29,000.

A set of rare photographs from the Rolling Stones' 1965 gig on the Isle of Wight was recently sold by Omega Auctions for $7,554.

Brian Jones' guitar

Brian Jones' guitarBrian Jones' memorabilia is some of the most valuable, a result of his early death and key role in forming the band

As the Rolling Stones' career reached its peak, so did their hedonistic lifestyle. Brian Jones became increasingly detached from the band, with Mick Jagger stating that he was "not psychologically suited to this way of life".

The guitarist, who had founded the band, was found dead in his swimming pool in east Sussex on July 3, 1969.

Due to his virtuosic style and tragic death, Jones' collectibles are now some of the most valuable. This Harmony Stratotone guitar was played by Brian Jones on stage at their first ever gig and many more. It sold at Christie's in 2009 for an impressive $130,208.

Rolling Stones tongue logo

Rolling Stones tongue logoThe most recognisable logo in rock history

After Mick Taylor was drafted in to replace the deceased Brian Jones, the Rolling Stones charged forward into another highly successful period of their career. However, the 1960s were well and truly over and the band needed a new look.

And so, the famous tongue and lips design that has now become synonymous with the Rolling Stones was designed by John Pasche in 1971. The original artwork for this, the most recognisable logo in rock history, sold for $531,700 at Cooper Owen in December 2005.

Mick Jagger's jumpsuit

Mick Jagger jumpsuit 1972Jagger's stage outfits have been toned down in recent years, but only a little

As the Rolling Stones continued to perform at the top of their game, Mick Jagger's flamboyant style was truly allowed to blossom. The band had long since been filling stadiums and their performances needed to match their sound - long gone were the days when musicians remained rooted to the spot.

Mick Jagger is famous for his eccentric jumpsuits. This example, designed by Ossie Clark for the 1972 US tour sold at Christie's in November 2012 for $32,000.

With Jagger now adored by millions and an icon of the rock world, the father of pop art, Andy Warhol, decided to immortalise him in one of his celebrated artworks. An acrylic and silkcreen portrait of Jagger by Warhol sold for $1.2m at Sotheby's in 2006.

Ronnie Wood's Fender Stratocaster

Ronnie Wood signed guitar auctionWood objected to the auction of his belongings, which was organised by his scorned ex-wife, Jo, following their split in 2008

Sadly, Mick Taylor's stint with the Stones was not to last, and the guitarist bowed out gracefully in 1974.

His replacement was former Jeff Beck Group and Faces member Ronnie Wood, who had been friends with theStones for some time. Joining in 1975, he has remained with the band ever since, making him their longest serving guitarist.

Wood is also an artist and has created countless paintings of the Stones in action, which are frequently exhibited around the world.

This guitar sold at the controversial auction of his property (organised by his ex-wife, Jo Wood) for $22,500. The signed Fender Stratocaster shows a scene of the Rolling Stones in the recording studio painted by Wood.

Glastonbury memorabilia?

Glastonbury Festival posterWill the poster for 2013's Glastonbury Festival become a collectible of the future?

The Rolling Stones' performance at Glastonbury 2013 truly put the cherry on top of a monumental career, and with the band now well into their 60s, it's unlikely that they will ever surpass this moment.

Will memorabilia from the festival become sought after in the years to come? We think so, so anyone who was there should hold onto any itemswith a very tight grip!

See our full selection of Rolling Stones memorabilia for sale.

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