Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) (PT101)

paulfrasercollectibles

2015-06-26 11:51:22

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Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) (PT101)

Personal letter written by the leading psychoanalyst

The neurologist, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) was a prolific essayist whose musings, drawn from psychoanalysis, altered modern perceptions on history, gender and culture.

Sigmund Freud, signed personal letterSigmund Freud, signed personal letter

In German, signed "Freud," one page, 5.75 x 9.25, personal letterhead, February 11, 1925.

Letter to a colleague, in full, "Enclosed is a copy of my letter to Sadger, together with his - I am happy to note - thoughtful and friendly response. I think, we have no choice but to consider the matter closed and must refuse to believe any further rumours. Would you be so kind and forward the enclosures to Dr. Hitschmann with the request to return them both to me."

Impressive double float matted and framed with a portrait of Freud, and a full translation, to an overall size of 38.5 x 25.5. In fine condition, with some light corner and edge creasing, a bit heavier to top, and a paperclip impression to left edge. An interesting letter mentioning two of Freud's colleagues, worthy of further research.

Isidor Isaak Sadger (1867-1942) was a forensic doctor and psychoanalyst in Vienna. He studied with Sigmund Freud from 1895 to 1904 with a concentration in homosexuality and fetishism and coined the term Sadomasochismus (sadomasochism) in 1913. He also coined the term Narcissisum.

In 1930 Sadger published his memoir, Sigmund Freud: Persnliche Erinnerungen. With the rise of Nazism and World War II, the book became lost to the world of psychoanalytic history until it was recently rediscovered. In September 1942, he was deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp, where he died.

Eduard Hitschmann's (1871-1957) many psychoanalytic publications did not always receive a friendly appraisal by Freud, who maintained a certain intellectual distance in spite of their friendship. However, Freud entrusted Hitchsmann to direct the psychoanalytic outpatient clinic when it was established in Vienna in 1922.

Hitschmann fled the Nazis in 1938 and sought refuge in London; in 1944 he emigrated to Boston where he worked as a training analyst until his death.

(PT101)

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