René Lalique vases at Bonhams auction

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2015-06-26 10:45:43

René Lalique vases at Bonhams auction

13 Jun 2012, 10:26 GMT+01

Bonhams June 12th auction, The Colors of René Lalique and Design from 1860, saw many stunning pieces achieve impressive results.

The major designs of Lalique, plus a few rare examples of his work, were showcased in the auction, as well as pieces by other artists dating from the mid-Victorian era.

René Jules Lalique (1860-1945), a French glass designer, was known for his Art Deco perfume bottles, jewellery, chandeliers, clocks and car hood ornaments as well as his unique and beautiful vases.

The top selling Lalique vases were ‘Montargis’ (1929) sold for £44,450, and the unusual ‘Frise Aigles’ (1911), one of only three of this design known to exist, which fetched £43,250 after a pre-sale estimate of just £5,000-£7,000.

Lalique’s vases comprised a large proportion of the lots. Almost all of his pieces sold, well into the thousands, with many including Archers (1921), Sophora (1926), Perruches (1919), Poissons (1921) and Serpent (1924) topping the £20,000 mark, and Bacchantes (1927) hitting £30,000.

The top selling lot of the auction was in fact not a Lalique piece, but a rare 1880s lumpy stoneware bed warmer, shaped as a tortoise, by Robert Wallace Martin. This fetched £46,850. A somewhat unsightly and very menacing-looking bird jar and cover by the Martin Brothers dating from 1898 also did very well, achieving £32,450.

Other popular non-Lalique items were a bronze and carved ivory figure of a woman, called Spring Awakening by Ferdinand Preiss, sold for £22,500, an early silver centrepiece with flower bud feet by George Jensen for £23,750, and a five piece silver tea service from 1922 by Dagobert Peche, designed for the Wiener Werkstatte, for £25,000.

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