Rare Luger, one of just 25 made, aims high at Greg Martin's January sale

paulfrasercollectibles

2015-06-26 12:12:12

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Rare Luger, one of just 25 made, aims high at Greg Martin's January sale

Expectations are high after the same auctioneer sold an even rarer Luger in 2010 for a six-figure sum

Greg Martin Auctions' Fine Collectible Firearms Auction, which takes place in Las Vegas in January 2011, promises to be a memorable event-especially for collectors of German Luger pistols and carbines.

Among the many fine examples are an ultra rare cased presentation Model 1902 Luger Semi-Automatic Carbine by DWM; a unique Model 1902 American Eagle Cartridge-Counter Luger; a rare Georg Luger Model 1902 Prototype Pistol; and a scarce Model 1907 .45 calibre Luger, one of fewer than 25 manufactured.

The gun's rarity makesit a strong investment. Also included is a rare Borchardt Model 1893 Semi-Automatic Pistol. These are only a small representation of the more than 100 rare and collectible Lugers offered in this sale.

American Eagle Luger semi-automatic carbineAmerican Eagle Luger semi-automatic carbine

The auctioneer has had an interesting 2010 with some memorable sales, especially of antique guns. In June they sold a genuine 1876 Gatling gun.

Marked as having been issued to the New Jersey National Guard, the 1876 Gatling was builtduring a significant periodof the US Government's campaigns against hostiles in the West. It was also a featured display at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia,of 1876.

Dr R J Gatling himself was present at the exhibition's opening day of May 10, 1876, presided over by President Ulysses S Grant. Grant dulyawarded Gatling a medal for his fearsome new invention.

The terrifying Gatling gun frightened bidders into parting with more than even the high estimate of $250,000, bringing $280,000.

That wasn't the highest value weapon they sold that year, however. That honour went to an antique handgun.

The legendary Georg Luger created the handgun for his company DWM to compete in the US military trials of 1907. He took examples of this 'Pistole Parabellum' to the trials personally, where they performed well.

Despite this, DWM withdrew from the trials, believing that a foreign handgun was unlikely to be accepted, and thus refused the further demand for 200 further pieces for continuing tests. One of the two handguns used in the trials has long disappeared, but the other was sold by the auctioneer for $494,000.

All the more reason then for collectors and investors to pay close attention to the upcoming sale, which takes place on January 16.

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