A Civil War Tribute to Royalist Power (PT7)

paulfrasercollectibles

2015-06-26 11:45:33

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A Civil War Tribute to Royalist Power (PT7)

Arguably one of the most Artistic hand engraved designs upon a Royalist Civil War Coin

The design of this coin is one of the most famous in the Provincial Mintings of King Charles I (1625-49) as the engraving is unparalleled in any other coin of the reign.

The coin was made by hand, no machinery was involved in the process.

The inspiration no doubt comes from a medallion with a similar horseman, of 1639 struck to commemorate the Scottish Rebellion.

Charles I (1625-49), silver Halfcrown, Exeter Mint, 1642Charles I (1625-49), silver Halfcrown, Exeter Mint, 1642

Charles I (1625-49), silver Halfcrown, Exeter Mint, dated 1642, spirited King holding baton, on horseback, horse trampling over spears and axes, beaded circle surrounding, mint mark rose both sides, abbreviated Latin legend carolvs d g mag br fr et hi rex, (Charles by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland), reverse, oval quartered shield of arms in scroll frame that incorporates date beneath, beaded circle surrounding, Latin legend christo avspice regno (I reign under the Auspice of Christ), diameter approximately 38mm, weight 14.17gms, Small dig in obverse field, slightly double struck on reverse, light scratches behind horseman, toned nearly very fine and very rare

A numismatic dating puzzle

The location of where this coin was struck and when had intrigued numismatists for many decades.

In the Regency period it was thought stylistically to have been struck when King Charles moved his Standard to York.

However the initial mark being rose on the coin, placed this design with the Mint of Exeter, and thoughts of Exeter were firmly in place by the mid-19th Century.

However, from contemporary records, Exeter as a Mint did not open until 1643 and ran its operation until 1646, so the date of 1642 was a mystery.

So where was this coin struck?

The dating puzzle was thought to have been solved when contemporary family papers of Sir Richard Vyvyan were examined in 1928 revealing that he was commissioned in 1642 to operate the Truro Mint in Cornwall, which later transferred to Exeter when the City was captured by the Parliamentarians.

Over six decades later the true provenance is discovered

It was only in 1992 that work was published proving this coin is an Exeter issue from a systematic study of the die sequence - the order in which the obverse and reverse designs were used.

It was revealed that the coin was struck in 1644 and most likely shows the date 1642 as a commemorative reference to the raising of the King's standard at Nottingham on the 22nd August 1642 at the beginning of the Civil War.

An early commemoration coin of a very significant event, with an exceptional design, executed with the utmost care and attention in the engraving.

There are less than 25 examples of this coin in existence.

(PT7)

For Sale: 15,000 SORRY, THIS ITEM IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE. TO GET FIRST REFUSAL ON NEW STOCK ITEMS PLEASE SIGN UP TO YOUR FREE NEWSLETTER AT THE TOP OF THE PAGE

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