Lot 63: Stukeley (William) An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works: with his Antient Map of Roman Brittain

DominicWinter

2015-11-05 11:28:00

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Lot 63: Stukeley (William). An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works: with his Antient Map of Roman Brittain; and the Itinerary thereof. Read at the Antiquarian Society, March 18, 1756, London: Richard Hett, 1757, 94pp., folding engraved map of Roman Britain (with closed tear to fold), one plate of facsimile writing, armorial bookplate of 'A. Gifford, D.D. of the Museum' to verso of title (manuscript ink classification note to recto of title), some browning to margins mostly first & last leaves, occasional minor spotting, 20th century dark green quarter morocco gilt, slim 4to The account of Richard of Cirencester was written by Stukeley as a consequence of a literary forgery. Charles Bertrum, a student living in Copenhagen claimed to have discovered a 14th century map of Roman Britain which had been produced by a monk of Westminster. The correspondence between Bertram and himself form the basis of this work and later Bertam's own Britannicarum gentium historiae antiquae..., which was also published in 1757. Stukeley attempted to aquire the map for the British Museum and the map itself was not fully discredited as a forgery until 1869. The Baptist minister Andrew Gifford FSA (1700-1784) was the son of Emanuel Gifford, and grandson of Andrew Gifford, who were both Bristol Baptist ministers. He studied at the academy of Samuel Jones, Tewkesbury and later under Dr. John Ward (a trustee of the British Museum). He assisted his father's ministerial work in Bristol in 1726 and in 1730 accepted the position of Baptist minister in Eagle Street, London. Gifford was appointed assitant librarian at the British Museum in 1757 and held the position until his death. (1) Dominic Winter's Travel & Natural History Maps, Prints & Sporting Art Early Printed Books Military History Wednesday, 11th November 2015 Estimate: £300-400
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